November 23rd, 2013

Golden Hair

Murder Must Advertise

Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L. Sayers

In which Sayers takes yet another turn.  Refraining from even trying to marry Lord Peter off -- Harriet Vane is alluded to, once -- she writes a mystery in which Lord Peter himself only slowly comes into view.  And provides a gimlet-eyed view of the advertising agency.   (The agency where she worked actually put up a plaque commemorating that a fictional employee had been thrown down it.)

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Golden Hair

A Journey to the Forbidden China

A Journey to the Forbidden China by Steven W. Mosher

Mosher was one of the first social scientists allowed into Communist China.  He spent most of his time in the Pearl River Delta, a place where he was shocked by the poverty, and where officials would shake their heads over how rich they were, and peasants from other regions would illegally sneak in for the chance at the worst jobs.  He managed to wangle a permit to travel by land farther into China.  This is his account of the road trip.
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A Birthday

terms and infodump

Whatever the world's -- unique traits are, chances are the characters have some way to refer to them.  Whether it's invented terms or English terminology pressed into new uses by the force of world-building.

The trick is getting it across.  Without using a character new to the area, whether a transplant from our world or from another region.  That's just the classic question of motives and dialog.  (Instructing children in a class or other formal education is the same principle.)
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