marycatelli (marycatelli) wrote,
marycatelli
marycatelli

titles, titles. . . and other stuff

Titles range all over the place.  Sometimes, the title comes first and inspires the story, which may even, after it's done, still fit the title.  Sometimes the title suggests itself along the way.  And sometimes the story is ready to go except for the title itself.

And so a question. (No, on reflection, two questions. The other one's about a cover.)

I have a work that I've got three titles for, none of which I really like.  It's a high-to-dark fantasy, and to give the blurb:

Growing up between the Wizards' Wood and its marvels, and the finest university of wizardry in the world, Nick Briarwood always thought that he wanted to learn wizardry.

When his father attempts to offer him to a demon in a deal, the deal rebounded on him, and Nick survives -- but all the evidence points to his having made the deal.

Now he really wants to learn wizardry.  Even though the university, the best place to master it, is also the place where he is most likely to be discovered.



And I've got three possible titles: His Father's Son, A Diabolical Bargain, and The Wizards and the Wood, and while I think the third a little flat, the other two might not give a good idea of the story and its genre.  Because it does play out in setting of a wizardly university and an enchanted forest.   What do people think of their accuracy?

And I'm wrestling with the covers, too.   Which one is better?  (With the final title, of course.)

Moon3
Forest6a
Tags: covers, my stuff, titles
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